Nutrition

Eat this, not that—and the “this” and the “that” change, almost daily. We’ll help sort out myths from facts and use evidence to do that. So, whether you’re interested in the Mediterranean diet or chia seeds muffins, we hope you find useful information!.

Fitness

Fitness is vital to good health from heart disease to cancer. So, get that 30 minutes, or is it 60 minutes of exercise daily 3 times a week or is it supposed to be every day? Again, let's simplify the rules and sort out facts..

General Health

After nutrition and fitness, that leaves a lot of territory from indoor air pollution to needed vaccinations to whether children always need antibiotics for ear infections. Let's look at the most recent evidence in simple terms.

   


From the Blog:

A new finding so good…

Lately, we have been so busy (and I know you do not CARE) that several really helpful articles have come and gone and I just have not had time to post them.    This blog serves as a notebook for me on health topics and hopefully some help to folks who might venture on to the blog.  But this article is so good and so potentially helpful that I want to store it for myself to share in community talks and on my radio show and with those who might stumble onto this blog.

15 minutes daily exercise may be reasonable target in older adults

Just 15 minutes of physical activity a day was associated with a 22 percent lower risk of death

Date:
June 14, 2016
Source:
European Society of Cardiology
Summary:
Fifteen minutes of daily exercise is associated with a 22 percent lower risk of death and may be a reasonable target for older adults, reveals new research.
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Fifteen minutes of daily exercise is associated with a 22% lower risk of death and may be a reasonable target for older adults, reveals research presented today at the EuroPRevent 2016 meeting by Dr David Hupin, a physician in the Department of Clinical and Exercise Physiology, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne in Saint-Etienne, France.

“Age is not an excuse to do no exercise,” said Dr Hupin. “It is well established that regular physical activity has a better overall effect on health than any medical treatment. But less than half of older adults achieve the recommended minimum of 150 minutes moderate intensity or 75 minutes vigorous intensity exercise each week.”

er levels of exercise could be beneficial and even reduce mortality in older adults.”

The authors studied two cohorts. A French cohort of 1011 subjects aged 65 in 2001 was followed over a period of 12 years. An international cohort of 122 417 subjects aged 60 was included from a systematic review and meta-analysis using PubMed and Embase databases, with a mean follow up of 10 years.

Physical activity was measured in Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) minutes per week, which refers to the amount of energy (calories) expended per minute of physical activity. One MET minute per week is equal to the amount of energy expended just sitting. The number of MET minutes an individual clocks up every week depends on the intensity of physical activity. For example, moderate intensity activity ranges between 3 and 5.9 MET minutes while vigorous intensity activity is classified as 6 or more.

The recommended levels of exercise equate to between 500 and 1000 MET minutes every week. The authors looked at the associated risk of death for four categories of weekly physical activity in MET minutes, defined as inactive (reference for comparison), low (1-499), medium (500-999) or high (over 1000).

During the follow up there were 88 (9%) and 18 122 (15%) deaths in the French and international cohorts, respectively. The risk of death reduced in a dose response relationship as the level of exercise increased. Compared to those who were inactive, older adults with low, medium and high activity levels had a 22%, 28% and 35% lower risk of death, respectively.

Dr Hupin said: “These two studies show that the more physical activity older adults do, the greater the health benefit. The biggest jump in benefit was achieved at the low level of exercise, with the medium and high levels bringing smaller increments of benefit.”

“We found that the low level of activity, which is half the recommended amount, was associated with a 22% reduced risk of death in older adults compared with those who were inactive,” said Dr Hupin. “This level of activity equates to a 15 minute brisk walk each day.”

He concluded: “We think that older adults should progressively increase physical activity in their daily lives rather than dramatically changing their habits to meet recommendations. Fifteen minutes a day could be a reasonable target for older adults. Small increases in physical activity may enable some older adults to incorporate more moderate activity and get closer to the recommended 150 minutes per week.”


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by European Society of Cardiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

European Society of Cardiology. “15 minutes daily exercise may be reasonable target in older adults: Just 15 minutes of physical activity a day was associated with a 22 percent lower risk of death.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 June 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/06/160614083104.htm>.


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Strange & Offbeat


A really tasty recipe- very healthy, very easy

Just tried a recipe from the Nutrition Action Healthletter- so yummy, so easy, SO HEALTHY.  Actually, I could make  meal out of it or eat it as a side dish or for dessert and hubby enjoyed it just as much.  I’ll make it again- even thinking that maybe it could be a meal served over brown rice with walnuts for protein- in which case I think I would increase the seasonings by half (in other words 3 T of canola oil, 1.5 T of balsamic vinegar, etc) in order for the rice to be seasoned.

Onions are one of THE healthiest vegetables for all sorts of reasons.  Folks who like onions will LOVE this dish.  Those who don’t will still probably enjoy this recipe.

Recipe:

Cut 1 lb of sweet potatoes into half inch cubes.  Toss with 1 large sweet onion chopped (in similar size pieces).  Combine 2 T of canola oil, 1 T of balsamic vinegar, 1 T of brown sugar, and 2 tsp of reduced sodium soy sauce.  Roast on a baking sheet (we put this on foil on the baking sheet and are glad that we did, easy cleanup) for 20 to 25 minutes until the potatoes are tender.  Let sit for 5 minutes before serving.  We drizzled about 1 T of maple syrup over the finished dish.  Gobbled this up (just the two of us).

Lots of fiber, lots of vitamin A, tons of good antioxidants, etc, etc.

 

If you need MORE evidence of the benefits of a healthy lifestyle, this is for YOU…

If you are one of those folks who needs MORE evidence of the benefits of a healthy lifestyle,  then this is for you….

Can a healthy lifestyle prevent cancer?

Date:
May 19, 2016
Source:
The JAMA Network Journals
Summary:
A large proportion of cancer cases and deaths among U.S. individuals who are white might be prevented if people quit smoking, avoided heavy drinking, maintained a BMI between 18.5 and 27.5, and got moderate weekly exercise for at least 150 minutes or vigorous exercise for at least 75 minutes, according to a new study.
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The authors of a new study suggest about 20 percent to 40 percent of cancer cases and about half of cancer deaths could potentially be prevented through modifications to adopt a healthy lifestyle.
Credit: © spotmatikphoto / Fotolia

A large proportion of cancer cases and deaths among U.S. individuals who are white might be prevented if people quit smoking, avoided heavy drinking, maintained a BMI between 18.5 and 27.5, and got moderate weekly exercise for at least 150 minutes or vigorous exercise for at least 75 minutes, according to a new study published online by JAMA Oncology.

Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States.

Mingyang Song, M.D., Sc.D., of Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, and Edward Giovannucci, M.D., Sc.D., of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, Boston, analyzed data from two study groups of white individuals to examine the associations between a “healthy lifestyle pattern” and cancer incidence and death.

A “healthy lifestyle pattern” was defined as never or past smoking; no or moderate drinking of alcohol (one or less drink a day for women, two or less drinks a day for men); BMI of at least 18.5 but lower than 27.5; and weekly aerobic physical activity of at least 150 minutes moderate intensity or 75 minutes vigorous intensity. Individuals who met all four criteria were considered low risk and everyone else was high risk.

The study included 89,571 women and 46,399 men; 16,531 women and 11,731 had a healthy lifestyle pattern (low-risk group) and the remaining 73,040 women and 34,608 men were high risk.

The authors calculated population-attributable risk (PAR), which can be interpreted as the proportion of cases that would not occur if all the individuals adopted the healthy lifestyle pattern of the low-risk group.

The authors suggest about 20 percent to 40 percent of cancer cases and about half of cancer deaths could potentially be prevented through modifications to adopt the healthy lifestyle pattern of the low-risk group.

The authors note that including only white individuals in their PAR estimates may not be generalizable to other ethnic groups but the factors they considered have been established as risk factors in diverse ethnic groups too.

“These findings reinforce the predominate importance of lifestyle factors in determining cancer risk. Therefore, primary prevention should remain a priority for cancer control,” the authors conclude.

Editorial: The Preventability of Cancer

“We have a history of long delays from discovery to translating knowledge to practice. As a society, we need to avoid procrastination induced by thoughts that chance drives all cancer risk or that new medical discoveries are needed to make major gains against cancer, and instead we must embrace the opportunity to reduce our collective cancer toll by implementing effective prevention strategies and changing the way we live. It is these efforts that will be our fastest return on past investments in cancer research over the coming decades,” write Graham A. Colditz, M.D., Dr.P.H., and Siobhan Sutcliffe, Ph.D., of Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Mingyang Song, MD, ScD, Edward Giovannucci, MD, ScD. Preventable Incidence and Mortality of Carcinoma Associated With Lifestyle Factors Among White Adults in the United States. JAMA Oncol., May 2016 DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.0843
  2. Graham A. Colditz, MD, DrPH; Siobhan Sutcliffe, PhD. The Preventability of Cancer: Stacking the Deck. JAMA Oncol, May 2016 DOI: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.0889

Cite This Page:

The JAMA Network Journals. “Can a healthy lifestyle prevent cancer?.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 May 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160519120712.htm>.